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New study shows that seagulls transport hundreds of kilos of plastic from landfills into natural reserves

Researchers from the Doñana Biological Station (EBD-CSIC) have developed a plastic deposition model based on the diet and movement of gulls monitored by GPS telemetry, while feeding in landfills in...

Scientific evidence is undeniable: aquifer exploitation is causing serious impacts on the most iconic national park in Spain

A scientific team from the Doñana Biological Station and the Geological and Mining Institute, institutes of the Spanish National Research Council, has reviewed more than 70 studies and demonstrates...

Doñana’s situation in 2023: drought, high temperatures and clear species declines

The Doñana Biological Station – CSIC presents the report “State of the Biodiversity in Doñana” 2023 with the results of the Monitoring Program carried out by the ICTS-Doñana. 2023 has been a...

Se crea la primera base de datos sobre los impactos de las plantas invasoras en Europa

Personal investigador del CSIC participa en la elaboración de Plantimpactseurope, que incluye información de 104 especies invasoras de 29 países europeos. La base de datos, de libre acceso, es de...

Conserving genetic diversity needs to account for biodiversity protection

An international study with participation of the Doñana Biological Station shows that current efforts for genetic diversity monitoring in Europe are incomplete and insufficient.

Genetic...

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The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world's oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 120 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Anthropogenic alterations on land and at sea have led to a poor conservation status of many petrels with 49 (41%) threatened species based on IUCN criteria and 61 (51%) suffering population declines. Some species are well-studied, even being used as bioindicators of ocean health, yet for others there are major knowledge gaps regarding their breeding grounds, migratory areas or other key aspects of their biology and ecology. Here, 38 petrel conservation researchers summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List of threatened species to identify knowledge gaps that must be filled to improve conservation and management of petrels. Research advances on the main threats for petrels are highlighted: invasive species at breeding grounds, bycatch, overfishing, light pollution, climate change, and pollution. An ambitious goal is proposed to reverse at least some of these six main threats, through active efforts such as restoring island habitats (e.g. invasive species removal, control and prevention), improving policies and regulations at global and regional levels, and engaging local communities in conservation efforts. The clear message that emerges from this review is the continued need for research and monitoring to inform and motivate effective conservation at the global level. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Rodríguez et al (2019) Future directions in conservation research on petrels and shearwaters. Front Mar Sci DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00094


https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00094/abstract