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The costs of mischoosing are not uniform across individuals

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Matching habitat choice is a particular form of habitat selection based on self?assessment of local performance that offers individuals a means to optimize the match of phenotype to the environment. Despite the advantages of this mechanism in terms of increased local adaptation, examples from natural populations are extremely rare. One possible reason for the apparent rarity of matching habitat choice is that it might be manifest only in those segments of a population for which the cost of a phenotype–environment mismatch is high. To test this hypothesis, we used a breeding population of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) exposed to size-dependent predation risk by bears, and evaluated the costs of mischoosing in discrete groups (e.g. male versus females, and ocean?age 2 versus ocean?age 3) using reproductive life span as a measure of individual performance. Bear preference for larger fish, especially in shallow water, translates into a performance trade-off that sockeye salmon can potentially use to guide their settlement decisions. Consistent with matching habitat choice, we found that salmon of similar ocean?age and size tended to cluster together in sites of similar water depth. However, matching habitat choice was only favoured in 3?ocean females – the segment of the population most vulnerable to bear predation. This study illustrates the unequal relevance of matching habitat choice to different segments of a population, and suggests that ‘partial matching habitat choice' could have resulted in an underestimation of the actual prevalence of this mechanism in nature. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camacho & Hendry (2020) Matching habitat choice: it's not for everyone. Oikos DOI 10.1111/oik.06932


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/oik.06932
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LC-MS determination of catecholamines and related metabolites in red deer urine and hair

LC-MS determination of catecholamines and related metabolites in red deer urine and hair

A novel analytical methodology for the determination and extraction of catecholamines (dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine) and their metabolites DL-3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol and DL-3,4-dihydroxymandelic acid by LC-MS is here developed and validated for application to human and animal urine and hair samples. The method is based on the preliminary extraction of analytes by a magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) composite. This is followed by a < 9 min chromatographic separation of the target compounds in an Onyx Monolithic C18 column using a mixture of 0.01% (v/v) heptafluorobutyric acid in water and methanol at 500 µL min-1 flow rate. Detection limits within range from 0.055 to 0.093 µg mL-1, and precision values of the response and retention times of analytes were > 90%. Accuracy values comprised the range 79.5–109.5% when the analytes were extracted from deer urine samples using the selected MMWCNT-poly(STY-DVB) sorbent. This methodology was applied to real red deer urine and hair samples, the resulting concentrations within range from 0.05 to 0.5 µg mL-1for norepinephrine and from 1.0 to 44.5 µg mL-1 for its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl glycol. Analyses of red deer hair resulted in high amounts of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Murtada et al (2019) LC-MS determination of catecholamines and related metabolites in red deer urine and hair extracted using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotube poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) composite. J Chromatogr B https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jchromb.2019.121878


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S157002321931150X