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Understanding the processes leading to fossilization

Modern death assemblages provide insights about the early stages of fossilization and useful ecological information about the species inhabiting the ecosystem. The results of taphonomic monitoring of modern vertebrate carcasses and bones from Doñana National Park, a Mediterranean coastal ecosystem in Andalusia, Spain, are presented. Ten different habitats were surveyed. Half of them occur in active depositional environments (marshland, lake margin, river margin, beach and dunes). Most of the skeletal remains belong to land mammals larger than 5 kg in body weight (mainly wild and feral ungulates). Overall, the Doñana bone assemblage shows good preservation with little damage to the bones, partly as a consequence of the low predator pressure on large vertebrates. Assemblages from active depositional habitats differ significantly from other habitats in terms of the higher incidence of breakage and chewing marks on bones in the latter, which result from scavenging, mainly by wild boar and red fox. The lake-margin and river-margin death assemblages have high concentrations of well preserved bones that are undergoing burial and offer the greatest potential to produce fossil assemblages. The spatial distribution of species in the Doñana death assemblage generally reflects the preferred habitats of the species in life. Meadows seem to be a preferred winter habitat for male deer, given the high number of shed antlers recorded there. This study is further proof that taphonomy can provide powerful insights to better understand the ecology of modern species and to infer past and future scenarios for the fossil record. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Domingo et al (2020) Taphonomic information from the modern vertebrate death assemblage of Doñana National Park, Spain. PLOS ONE 15(11): e0242082. DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0242082


https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0242082
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The roles of remote sensing in nature conservation

The roles of remote sensing in nature conservation

During recent decades, a rapid increase in available data sources has enabled researchers to develop hundreds of new remote sensing applications using data provided by new sensors attached to satellites, aircrafts and drones. However, a major challenge remains unresolved: how to transfer the knowledge of these technological advances to conservation practitioners and facilitate access to the remote sensing products that are currently available.  In this volume, the ability of new technologies, such as drones, camera traps or miniaturized sensors, to enhance our information on habitat condition, species occurrence, invasive species mapping or biodiversity is illustrated. There are several case studies from Natura 2000 and LTER sites:  these were designed to meet the requirements of the EC Birds and Habitats Directives and the commitments associated with the EU Biodiversity Strategy, including regular habitat assessments. In this volume, a practical perspective on how remote sensing applications can benefit these long-term monitoring or surveillance programs is provided. With these requirements in mind, the time is now right for conservation ecologists, researchers, technicians, managers, policy makers and practitioners to embrace the new technologies and products that are available from the remote sensing community. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Díaz-Delgado et al (2017) The Roles of Remote Sensing in Nature Conservation. A Practical Guide and Case Studies © Springer International Publishing AG2017. Pp. 318. Springer, Cham, Switzerland. ISBN: 978-3-319-64330-4, DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-64332-8


http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319643304