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The costs of mischoosing are not uniform across individuals

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Matching habitat choice is a particular form of habitat selection based on self?assessment of local performance that offers individuals a means to optimize the match of phenotype to the environment. Despite the advantages of this mechanism in terms of increased local adaptation, examples from natural populations are extremely rare. One possible reason for the apparent rarity of matching habitat choice is that it might be manifest only in those segments of a population for which the cost of a phenotype–environment mismatch is high. To test this hypothesis, we used a breeding population of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) exposed to size-dependent predation risk by bears, and evaluated the costs of mischoosing in discrete groups (e.g. male versus females, and ocean?age 2 versus ocean?age 3) using reproductive life span as a measure of individual performance. Bear preference for larger fish, especially in shallow water, translates into a performance trade-off that sockeye salmon can potentially use to guide their settlement decisions. Consistent with matching habitat choice, we found that salmon of similar ocean?age and size tended to cluster together in sites of similar water depth. However, matching habitat choice was only favoured in 3?ocean females – the segment of the population most vulnerable to bear predation. This study illustrates the unequal relevance of matching habitat choice to different segments of a population, and suggests that ‘partial matching habitat choice' could have resulted in an underestimation of the actual prevalence of this mechanism in nature. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camacho & Hendry (2020) Matching habitat choice: it's not for everyone. Oikos DOI 10.1111/oik.06932


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/oik.06932
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Explaining path dependent rigidity traps: increasing returns, power, discourses and entrepreneurship intertwined in social-ecological systems

Explaining path dependent rigidity traps: increasing returns, power, discourses and entrepreneurship intertwined in social-ecological systems

The current, unprecedented rate of human development is causing major damages to Earth's life-support systems. Therefore, the need for transitions towards sustainability in the use of natural resources and ecosystems has been extensively advocated. To be successful, such transitions must be guided by a sound understanding of the architecture of the policy and institutional designs of both the process of change and the target outcome. This study contributes to current research on the institutional conditions necessary for successful transitions towards sustainability in social-ecological systems, addressing two interrelated theoretic-analytical questions through an in-depth case study focused in the Doñana region (south-west Spain). First, attention is driven on the need for enhanced historical causal explanations of social-ecological systems stuck in maladaptive rigidity traps at present. Second, attention is driven on the explanatory potential of several factors for shaping maladaptive outcomes, at two different levels of analysis: political-economic interests, prevailing discourses and power, at a contextual level, and institutional entrepreneurship, at an endogenous level. In particular, authors address that explanatory potential when the core logic of path dependence fails to predict maladaptive outcomes in historical, evolutionary perspective. When this occurs, such outcomes are often qualified as unexpected, hence subject to contingency, due to their divergence from purported superior, optimal alternatives. The study argues that contingency can be modulated away from randomness and better characterized as unpredictability, through the systematic inclusion of the mentioned factors into analysis. This would, in turn, increase capacity to inform future policy and institutional transitional designs towards sustainability. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Méndez et al (2019) Explaining path-dependent rigidity traps: increasing returns, power, discourses, and entrepreneurship intertwined in social-ecological systems. Ecol Soc  https://doi.org/10.5751/ES-10898-240230


https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol24/iss2/art30/