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Strategies shrubby junipers adopt to tolerate drought differ by site

Drought-induced dieback episodes are globally reported among forest ecosystems but they have been understudied in scrublands. Chronically-stressed individuals are supposed to be more vulnerable prior to drought which triggers death. Drought-triggered dieback and mortality events affecting Mediterranean Juniperus phoenicea scrublands were analyzed in two sites with contrasting climate and soil conditions located in Spain. The radial growth patterns of coexisting living and dead junipers, including the calculation of growth statistics used as early-warning signals, quantified growth response to climate, were characterized and the wood C and O isotope discrimination was analyzed. In the inland, continental site with rocky substrates (Yaso, Huesca, N Spain), dead junipers grew less than living junipers about three decades prior to the dieback started in 2016. However, in the coastal, mild site with sandy soils (Doñana, Huelva, SW Spain), dead junipers were smaller but grew more than living junipers about two decades before the dieback onset in 2005. The only common patterns between sites were the higher growth coherence in both living and dead junipers prior to the dieback, and the decrease in growth persistence of dead junipers. Cool and wet conditions in the prior winter and current spring, and cool summer conditions enhanced juniper growth. In Doñana, growth of living individuals was more reduced by warm July conditions than in the case of dead individuals. Higher ?13C values in Yaso indicate also more pronounced drought stress. In Yaso, dead junipers presented lower ?18O values, but the opposite occurred in Doñana suggesting different changes in stomatal conductance prior to death. Warm summer conditions enhance evapotranspiration rates and trigger dieback in this shallow-rooted species, particularly in sites with a poor water-holding capacity. Chronic, slow growth is not always a reliable predictor of drought-triggered mortality. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camarero et al (2020) Dieback and mortality of junipers caused by drought: Dissimilar growth and wood isotope patterns preceding shrub death. Agr Forest Meteorol 291, 108078. DOI 10.1016/j.agrformet.2020.108078


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168192320301805?dgcid=author#ack0001
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Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach

Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach

Understanding the factors promoting species formation is a major task in evolutionary biology research. In this project, the evolutionary history of the six putative species included within the Californian scrub white oak species complex has been studied. To infer the relative importance of geographical isolation and ecological divergence in driving the speciation process, authors have first analysed inter- and intra-specific patterns of genetic differentiation and employed an approximate Bayesian computation framework to evaluate different plausible scenarios of species divergence. In a second step, the inferred divergence pathways has been linked with current and past species distribution models, and tested for niche differentiation and phylogenetic niche conservatism across taxa. Analyses showed that the most plausible scenario is the one considering the divergence of two main lineages followed by a more recent pulse of speciation. Genotypic data in conjunction with species distribution models and niche differentiation analyses support that different factors (geography vs. environment) and modes of speciation (parapatry, allopatry and maybe sympatry) have played a role in the divergence process within this complex. This study shows that different mechanisms can drive divergence even among closely related taxa representing early stages of species formation and exemplifies the importance of adopting integrative approaches to get a better understanding of the speciation process and the evolutionary phenomena contributing to generate biodiversity. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Ortego et al (2015) Evolutionary and demographic history of the Californian scrub white oak species complex: an integrative approach. Mol Ecol 24, 6188-6208 doi: 10.1111/mec.13457


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/mec.13457/full