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Genetic variability of red swamp crayfish reveals its invasion process

Patterns of genetic diversity in invasive populations can be modulated by a range of factors acting at different stages of the invasion process, including the genetic composition of the source population(s), the introduction history (e.g. propagule pressure), the environmental suitability of recipient areas, and the features of secondary introductions. The North American red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, is one of the most widely introduced freshwater species worldwide. It was legally introduced into Spain twice, near the city of Badajoz in 1973 and in the Guadalquivir marshes in 1974. Thereafter the species rapidly colonised almost the entire Iberian Peninsula. Seven nuclear microsatellites were used to describe the genetic diversity and structure of 28 locations distributed across the Iberian Peninsula and to explain the expansion process of the red swamp crayfish. Additionally, the relationship between environmental suitability and genetic diversity of the studied locations were analysed. The red swamp crayfish had a clear spatial genetic structure in the Iberian Peninsula, probably determined by the two independent introduction events in the 1970s, which produced two main clusters separated spatially, one of which was dominant in Portugal and the other in Spain. The human-mediated dispersal process seemed to have involved invasion hubs, hosting highly genetically diverse areas and acting as sources for subsequent introductions. Genetic diversity also tended to be higher in more suitable environments across the Iberian Peninsula. These results showed that the complex and human-mediated expansion of the red swamp crayfish in the Iberian Peninsula has involved several long- and short-distance movements and that both ecological and anthropogenic factors have shaped the genetic diversity patterns resulting from this invasion process. Early detection of potential invasion hubs may help to halt multiple short-distance translocations and thus the rapid expansion of highly prolific invasive species over non-native areas. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Acevedo-Limón et al (2020) Historical, human, and environmental drivers of genetic diversity in the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) invading the Iberian Peninsula. Freshwater Biology. Doi 10.1111/fwb.13513


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/fwb.13513
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The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

Shearwaters and petrels (hereafter petrels) are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world's oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 120 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Anthropogenic alterations on land and at sea have led to a poor conservation status of many petrels with 49 (41%) threatened species based on IUCN criteria and 61 (51%) suffering population declines. Some species are well-studied, even being used as bioindicators of ocean health, yet for others there are major knowledge gaps regarding their breeding grounds, migratory areas or other key aspects of their biology and ecology. Here, 38 petrel conservation researchers summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List of threatened species to identify knowledge gaps that must be filled to improve conservation and management of petrels. Research advances on the main threats for petrels are highlighted: invasive species at breeding grounds, bycatch, overfishing, light pollution, climate change, and pollution. An ambitious goal is proposed to reverse at least some of these six main threats, through active efforts such as restoring island habitats (e.g. invasive species removal, control and prevention), improving policies and regulations at global and regional levels, and engaging local communities in conservation efforts. The clear message that emerges from this review is the continued need for research and monitoring to inform and motivate effective conservation at the global level. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Rodríguez et al (2019) Future directions in conservation research on petrels and shearwaters. Front Mar Sci DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2019.00094


https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2019.00094/abstract