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The costs of mischoosing are not uniform across individuals

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Matching habitat choice is a particular form of habitat selection based on self?assessment of local performance that offers individuals a means to optimize the match of phenotype to the environment. Despite the advantages of this mechanism in terms of increased local adaptation, examples from natural populations are extremely rare. One possible reason for the apparent rarity of matching habitat choice is that it might be manifest only in those segments of a population for which the cost of a phenotype–environment mismatch is high. To test this hypothesis, we used a breeding population of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) exposed to size-dependent predation risk by bears, and evaluated the costs of mischoosing in discrete groups (e.g. male versus females, and ocean?age 2 versus ocean?age 3) using reproductive life span as a measure of individual performance. Bear preference for larger fish, especially in shallow water, translates into a performance trade-off that sockeye salmon can potentially use to guide their settlement decisions. Consistent with matching habitat choice, we found that salmon of similar ocean?age and size tended to cluster together in sites of similar water depth. However, matching habitat choice was only favoured in 3?ocean females – the segment of the population most vulnerable to bear predation. This study illustrates the unequal relevance of matching habitat choice to different segments of a population, and suggests that ‘partial matching habitat choice' could have resulted in an underestimation of the actual prevalence of this mechanism in nature. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camacho & Hendry (2020) Matching habitat choice: it's not for everyone. Oikos DOI 10.1111/oik.06932


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/oik.06932
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The 5,000-year history of the horse

The 5,000-year history of the horse

Horse domestication revolutionized warfare and accelerated travel, trade and the geographic expansion of languages. This study presents the largest genome-scale time-series for a non-human organism to access the legacy of past equestrian civilizations in the genetic makeup of modern horses. It includes 87 new ancient genomes and genome-scale data of 132 animals. Two extinct horse lineages existed during early domestication at the far western (Iberia) and eastern range (Siberia) of Eurasia but contributed only marginally to modern diversity. Mule breeding started at least 2,200 years ago. Persian related horse lineages increasingly influence European and Asian populations in the centuries following the Islamic conquests until modern times. Multiple alleles associated with elite-racing, including at the MSTN "speed gene", only rose in popularity within the last few centuries. Finally, the development of modern breeding impacted genetic diversity more dramatically than all previous millennia of human management. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Fages et al (2019) Tracking five millennia of horse management with extensive ancient genome time series. Cell. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.03.049


https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(19)30384-8