News News

Strategies shrubby junipers adopt to tolerate drought differ by site

Drought-induced dieback episodes are globally reported among forest ecosystems but they have been understudied in scrublands. Chronically-stressed individuals are supposed to be more vulnerable prior to drought which triggers death. Drought-triggered dieback and mortality events affecting Mediterranean Juniperus phoenicea scrublands were analyzed in two sites with contrasting climate and soil conditions located in Spain. The radial growth patterns of coexisting living and dead junipers, including the calculation of growth statistics used as early-warning signals, quantified growth response to climate, were characterized and the wood C and O isotope discrimination was analyzed. In the inland, continental site with rocky substrates (Yaso, Huesca, N Spain), dead junipers grew less than living junipers about three decades prior to the dieback started in 2016. However, in the coastal, mild site with sandy soils (Doñana, Huelva, SW Spain), dead junipers were smaller but grew more than living junipers about two decades before the dieback onset in 2005. The only common patterns between sites were the higher growth coherence in both living and dead junipers prior to the dieback, and the decrease in growth persistence of dead junipers. Cool and wet conditions in the prior winter and current spring, and cool summer conditions enhanced juniper growth. In Doñana, growth of living individuals was more reduced by warm July conditions than in the case of dead individuals. Higher ?13C values in Yaso indicate also more pronounced drought stress. In Yaso, dead junipers presented lower ?18O values, but the opposite occurred in Doñana suggesting different changes in stomatal conductance prior to death. Warm summer conditions enhance evapotranspiration rates and trigger dieback in this shallow-rooted species, particularly in sites with a poor water-holding capacity. Chronic, slow growth is not always a reliable predictor of drought-triggered mortality. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camarero et al (2020) Dieback and mortality of junipers caused by drought: Dissimilar growth and wood isotope patterns preceding shrub death. Agr Forest Meteorol 291, 108078. DOI 10.1016/j.agrformet.2020.108078


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168192320301805?dgcid=author#ack0001
Average (0 Votes)

Latest News Latest News

Back

A risk assessment in Spain reveals that 30 invasive plant species are available for sale

A risk assessment in Spain reveals that 30 invasive plant species are available for sale

Horticulture is one of the main pathways of deliberate introduction of non-native plants, some of which might become invasive. Of the 914 commercial ornamental outdoor plant species sold in Spain, 700 (77%) are non-native (archaeophytes excluded) marketed species. These species were classified into six different lists based on their invasion status in Spain and elsewhere, their climatic suitability in Spain, and their potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts. Sufficient information for 270 species was available. A Priority List of eight regulated invasive species that were still available on the market is provided. Additionally an Attention List with 68 non-regulated invasive and potentially invasive species that might cause various impacts was established. To prioritise the species within the Attention List, the risk of invasion of these species was further assessed by using an adaptation of the Australian WRA protocol and the level of societal interest estimated from values of the Google Trends tool. Three other lists were proposed: A Green List of seven species with probably no potential to become invasive, a Watch List with 27 potentially invasive species with few potential impacts, and an Uncertainty List with 161 species of known status but with insufficient information to include them in any of the previous lists. For 430 (61%) of the marketed non-native plant species no sufficient information was available, which were compiled into a Data Deficient List. These findings of prohibited species for sale highlight the need for stronger enforcement of the regulations on invasive plant species in Spain. In addition, our results highlight the need for additional information on potential impacts and climate suitability of horticultural plants being sold in Spain, as insufficient information could be found to assess the invasion risk for a majority of species. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Bayon & Vilà (2019) Horizon scanning to identify invasion risk of ornamental plants marketed in Spain. NeoBiota 52: 47–86 (2019). DOI: 10.3897/neobiota.52.38113


https://neobiota.pensoft.net/article/38113/