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Transporting Biodiversity Using Transmission Power Lines as Stepping-Stones

The most common ecological response to climate change is the shifts in species distribution ranges. Nevertheless, landscape fragmentation compromises the ability of limited dispersal species to move following these climate changes. Building connected environments that enable species to track climate changes is an ultimate goal for biodiversity conservation. An experiment was conducted to determine if electric power transmission lines could be transformed in a continental network of biodiversity reserves for small animals. The study analysed if the management of the habitat located inside the base of the transmission electric towers (providing refuge and planting seedlings of native shrub) allowed to increase local richness of target species (i.e., small mammals and some invertebrates' groups). The results confirmed that by modifying the base of the electric transmission towers density and diversity of several species of invertebrates and small mammals increased as well as number of birds and bird species, increasing local biodiversity. The study suggests that modifying the base of the electric towers would potentially facilitate the connection of fragmented populations. This idea would be easily applicable in any transmission line network anywhere around the world, making it possible for the first time to build up continental scale networks of connectivity. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Ferrer et al (2020) Transporting Biodiversity Using Transmission Power Lines as Stepping-Stones? Diversity 12(11): 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12110439

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https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/12/11/439
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Workshop: Developing a priority list of invasive alien species in Europe

Developing a priority list of invasive alien species in Europe

The EU has recently approved its Regulation on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species, which will come into force in 2015. For successful implementation, the European Commission will need to adopt an EU list of invasive alien species, to be agreed with the Member States. BirdLife Europe, an international organization that promotes conservation science-based, will propose a priority list of species based on the best available evidence of potential impact, and will be achieved through a systematic approach. This task is organized along with the Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC) around two workshops that will be hosted in our premises in Seville on January 21st – 22nd.

Among participants: the universities of Cambridge, Vienna and Berne, the Centre for Environmental Research of Leipzig (UFZ, Germany), the Zoological Society of London, the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, international (EPPO, IUCN) and national organizations (Belgian Biodiversity Platform).