FINALIST EUROPEAN NATURA 2000 AWARD

We need your vote!

We are very happy to announce that the application entitled "Reinforcing the roles of remote sensing in Natura 2000 monitoring" presented by our colleague Ricardo Díaz-Delgado has been selected as a finalist of the European Natura 2000 award 2020 edition under Cross-border Cooperation and Networking category. As finalist, this proposal is eligible for the ‘European Natura 2000 Citizens' Award', the winner being decided by a public online vote. Feel free to share this initiative and if you would like to support it we kindly ask you to vote for it before 15 September 2020 at: https://natura2000award-application.eu/finalist/3126. In order to vote you should provide a valid email address in the webpage. A confirmation email will then be sent to the specified address with a link in the main body to be clicked in order to validate your vote. Only validated votes are counted. We sincerely thank you for your support and for spreading the news through your email lists, colleagues and social networks and media. This proposal is a result of the efforts made over the last years to transfer knowledge on the use of remote sensing in the conservation and monitoring of Natura 2000 protected areas. These efforts have contributed to the implementation of  the Eurosite Remote Sensing Support Group  and the publication of the book "The roles of remote sensing in nature conservation". All thanks to the collaboration between Eurosite and the Remote Sensing & GIS Lab and The Monitoring Team on Natural Resources and Processes of the Doñana Biological Station (EBD-CSIC).

 


https://natura2000award-application.eu/finalist/3126

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Invasive plants and urban development: a bad combination for coastal vegetation

Invasive plants and urban development: a bad combination for coastal vegetation

Land-use intensification and biological invasions are two of the most important global change pressures driving biodiversity loss. However, their combined impacts on biological communities have been seldom explored, which may result in misleading ecological assessments or mitigation actions. Based on an extensive field survey of 445 paired invaded and control plots of coastal vegetation in SW Spain, the joint effects of land-use intensification (agricultural and urban intensification) and invasion on the taxonomic and functional richness, mean plant height and leaf area of native plants were explored. The survey covered five invasive species with contrasting functional similarity and competitive ability in relation to the native community. The response of native communities for the overall and invader-specific datasets was modelled, and it was determined whether invader-native functional differences could influence the combined impacts of land-use intensification and invasion. Overall, urban intensification reduced taxonomic richness more strongly at invaded plots (synergistic interactive effects). In contrast, functional richness loss caused by urban intensification was less pronounced at invaded plots (antagonistic interactive effects). Overall models showed also that urban intensification led to reduced mean leaf area, while agriculture was linked to higher mean plant height. When exploring invader-specific models, the combined effects of agricultural and urban intensification with invasion were found to be heterogeneous. At invaded plots, invader-native functional differences accounted for part of this variability. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering the interactive effects of global change pressures for a better assessment and management of ecosystems. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Gutiérrez-Cánovas et al (2020) Combined effects of land-use intensification and plant invasion on native communities. Oecologia DOI 10.1007/s00442-020-04603-1


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31982953