Replicate radiations in Caribbean frogs

Replicate radiations, the repeated multiplication of species associated with ecological divergence, have attracted much attention and generated as much debate. Due to the few well?studied cases, it remains unclear whether replicate radiations are an exceptional result of evolution or a relatively common example of the power of adaptation by natural selection. The case of Eleutherodactylus frogs is examined here.

The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

Shearwaters and petrels are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 120 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Here, 38 petrel conservation researchers summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List...

Is restocking a useful tool for increasing rabbit densities?

The European rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus is endemic to Mediterranean ecosystems in the Iberian Peninsula, where it is a key species. In recent years its populations have declined due to several factors including habitat transformation and viral diseases. At the same time, corrective measures including population restocking in areas with low population densities using rabbits from other geographical areas have been performed. In this study we evaluate the impact restocking has had on the...

Body size reduction in the wood mouse population of Doñana

Thermoregulation, metabolism and life history of species are affected by body size and shape. Based on specimens of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus that were collected at Doñana National Park in 1978–81 and 2006–07, changes in body mass, body size, and allometry were tested between these periods. Furthermore, data from 1978–81, when more specimens were available, were used to evaluate the sexual dimorphism of adults. This study confirms and extends previous findings on...

The European trade ban on wild birds reduced invasion risks

International wildlife trade is a major source of current biological invasions. However, the power of trade regulations to reduce invasion risks at large, continental scales has not been empirically assessed. Although international policy responses to combat biological invasions have increased over the last several decades, responsibility for protection against invaders lies mostly on national governments. This has led to important differences in legislation among countries. If the ban...