Content with tag biological invasions .

One century of crayfish invasions

The red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), native to the southern United States and north-eastern Mexico, is currently the most widely distributed crayfish globally, as well as one of the invasive species with most devastating impacts on freshwater ecosystems. Reconstructing the introduction routes of invasive species and identifying the motivations that have led to those movements is necessary to accurately reduce the likelihood of further introductions. In this study, the temporal...

The European trade ban on wild birds reduced invasion risks

International wildlife trade is a major source of current biological invasions. However, the power of trade regulations to reduce invasion risks at large, continental scales has not been empirically assessed. Although international policy responses to combat biological invasions have increased over the last several decades, responsibility for protection against invaders lies mostly on national governments. This has led to important differences in legislation among countries. If the ban...

Eucalypt plantations disturb the development of amphibian larvae

Consequences of human actions like global warming, spread of exotic species or resource consumption are pushing species to extinction. Even species considered to be at low extinction risk often show signs of local declines. Here, the impact of eucalypt plantations, the best-known exotic tree species worldwide, was evaluated as well as its interaction with temperature and predators on amphibian development, growth, antipredator responses and physiology. For this purpose, a fully factorial...

A novel system for ranking and comparing the impacts of introduced species

Many alien taxa are known to cause socio-economic impacts by affecting the different constituents of human well-being (security; material and immaterial assets; health; social, spiritual and cultural relations; freedom of choice and action). Attempts to quantify socio-economic impacts in monetary terms are unlikely to provide a useful basis for evaluating and comparing impacts of alien taxa because they are notoriously difficult to measure and important aspects of human well-being are...

Assessing apple snail effects on ecosystem services in Europe

The assessment of the risk posed by invasive alien species to the environment is a component of increasing importance for Pest Risk Analysis. Standardized and comprehensive procedures to assess their impacts on ecosystem services have been developed only recently. The invasive apple snails (Pomacea canaliculata and P. maculata) are used as a case study to demonstrate the application of an innovative procedure assessing the potential impact of these species on shallow freshwater ecosystems...