Content with tag conservation .

The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

Shearwaters and petrels are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 120 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Here, 38 petrel conservation researchers summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List...

Loss of pollinators: evidences, causes and consequences

Over the past few years discussions on the pollinator crisis have increased and campaigns to save bees have multiplied. However, these campaigns have not always been evidence-based. During the last years, also research on this topic has substantially increased and our knowledge about the causes and consequences of the current loss of pollinators has reached an important maturity. This monograph reviews the importance of pollinators, their main threats and what consequences the decline of...

On the path to extinction: inbreeding and admixture in a declining gray wolf population

Allee effects reduce the viability of small populations in many different ways, which act synergistically to lead populations towards extinction vortexes. The Sierra Morena wolf population, isolated in the south of the Iberian Peninsula and composed of just one or few packs for decades, represents a good example of how diverse threats act additively in very small populations. The genome of one of the last wolves identified (and road?killed) in Sierra Morena and that of another wolf in the...

The roles of remote sensing in nature conservation

In this volume, the ability of new technologies, such as drones, camera traps or miniaturized sensors, to enhance our information on habitat condition, species occurrence, invasive species mapping or biodiversity is illustrated.

Evolutionary homogenization of bird communities in urban environments

The process of urbanization can lead to specialist species being replaced by generalist species in space and time, increasing similarity among bird communities. This phenomenon is termed biotic homogenization and is directly related to taxonomic and functional diversity. However, the effects of urbanization on phylogenetic diversity remain unclear. This study addresses the effects of the process of urbanization on the evolutionary distinctiveness of bird communities.