Content with tag ecological networks .

Less abundant animal and plant species gather in ghettos in order to survive

According to the competitive exclusion principle, species with low competitive abilities should be excluded by more efficient competitors; yet, they generally remain as rare species. The positive and negative spatial association networks of 326 disparate assemblages was described showing a general organization pattern that simultaneously supports the primacy of competition and the persistence of rare species.

Plant species abundance and phylogeny explain the structure of recruitment networks

Established plants can affect the recruitment of young plants, filtering out some and allowing the recruitment of others, with profound effects on plant community dynamics. Recruitment networks (RNs) depict which species recruit under which others. Here, whether species abundance and phylogenetic distance explain the structure of RNs across communities is investigated.

Stochastic and deterministic effects on interactions between canopy and recruiting species in forest communities

Interactions between established (canopy) and recruiting individuals (recruits) are pervasive in plant communities. Studies on recruitment in forests have mainly focused on negative density-dependent conspecific interactions, while the outcomes of heterospecific canopy–recruit interactions have received much less attention and are generally assumed to be driven by stochastic processes. Herein, the relative influence of stochastic (abundance) and deterministic (species identity and...

Competition between honeybees y wild pollinators

During the past decades, managed honeybee stocks have increased globally. Managed honeybees are particularly used within mass-flowering crops and often spill over to adjacent natural habitats after crop blooming. This study uniquely shows the simultaneous impact that honeybee spillover has on wild plant and animal communities in flower-rich woodlands via changes in plant–pollinator network structure that translate into a direct negative effect on the reproductive success of a dominant...

The Coevolving Web of Life

One of the major goals for ecologists and evolutionary biologists is to understand how webs of species form, how they change in participants over time, and how they affect evolution. Describing the full pattern of connections within these webs is a daunting task. This study attempted to understand how species coevolve within large webs of mutualistic species.