Content with tag population dynamics .

A synthesis of contemporary analytical and modeling approaches in population ecology

This new book provides an overview of the key analytical approaches that are currently used in demographic, genetic, and spatial analyses in population ecology. The chapters present current problems, introduce advances in analytical methods and models, and demonstrate the applications of quantitative methods to ecological data.

The six most important threats for petrels and shearwaters

Shearwaters and petrels are highly adapted seabirds that occur across all the world’s oceans. Petrels are a threatened seabird group comprising 120 species. They have bet-hedging life histories typified by extended chick rearing periods, low fecundity, high adult survival, strong philopatry, monogamy and long-term mate fidelity and are thus vulnerable to change. Here, 38 petrel conservation researchers summarize information regarding the most important threats according to the IUCN Red List...

Population dynamics of the Iberian hare in Doñana

The Iberian hare (Lepus granatensis) is a widely distributed endemic species in the Iberian Peninsula. To im¬prove knowledge of its population dynamics, the relative abundance and population trends of the Iberian hare were studied in the autumns of 1995–2012 in a protected area (Doñana National Park) by spotlighting in 2 different habitats: marshland and ecotones.

Survival and breeding success in Egyptian vulture

In long-lived species, the age-, stage- and/or sex-dependent patterns of survival and reproduction determine the evolution of life history strategies, the shape of the reproductive value, and ultimately population dynamics. This study evaluates the combined effects of age and sex in recruitment, breeder survival and breeding success of the globally endangered Egyptian vulture.

Potential threat to Eurasian griffon vultures in Spain from veterinary use of the drug diclofenac

Spain holds > 95% of the European breeding population of the Eurasian griffon vulture. Vultures provide important ecosystem services in carcass removal and influence emissions of greenhouse gases. Despite the known toxicity of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac to this species and other Gyps vultures, in March 2013 the Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios (AEMPS) approved the use of two medicines containing diclofenac for veterinary use in horses, pigs...