Documentación archivada Documentación archivada

Atrás

06_10_2016, Elena Gómez-Díaz,

06_10_2016, Elena Gómez-Díaz,

Subido por Carlos Ruiz Benavides, 10/10/16 14:46
Epigenetic cross-talk between the human malaria parasite and its mosquito vector Abstract: Host-parasite interactions are amongst the most plastic systems in nature. Epigenetic processes regulate transcription and provide means for rapid responses to the environment that can be heritable. To test the idea that epigenetic mechanisms regulate host-parasite adaptive phenotypic responses in the course of an infection, in this project I used a natural system involving the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its natural mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae. My investigations combine genome-wide analysis of trancription by RNA-seq, the analysis of histone modifications by ChIP-seq, as well as the study of chromatin structure by ATAC-seq, at different time stages during parasite life-cycle in the mosquito. In this talk I will focus first on the results on the parasite, which show that in the course of a malaria infection P.falciparum undergoes a number of alterations in patterns of gene expression, which depend in turn on reciprocal modifications to the structure and organization of the chromatin. Importantly, these changes impact genes linked to malaria pathogenesis. I will then move to present results on the mosquito vector. In this case, the comparison of histone modification and gene expression profiles between infected and uninfected mosquitoes allowed us to identify malaria responsive epigenes as those mosquito genes showing correlated changes in mRNA and histone mark levels in response to infection. In addition, the analysis of small non-coding RNAs identified a set of mosquito miRNAs whose abundance is altered in response to infection and potentially target multiple immune genes. These findings are not only relevant at the fundamental level for the fields of Plasmodium and mosquito biology, but have important practical implications for the design of new strategies to fight malaria.
Etiquetas: seminarios ebd
El fichero es demasiado grande para generar la previsualización o la vista en miniatura.
Comentarios
No hay ningún comentario aún. Sea usted el primero.

Versión 1.0

Modificado por última vez por Carlos Ruiz Benavides
10/10/16 14:46
Estado: Aprobado
Epigenetic cross-talk between the human malaria parasite and its mosquito vector Abstract: Host-parasite interactions are amongst the most plastic systems in nature. Epigenetic processes regulate transcription and provide means for rapid responses to the environment that can be heritable. To test the idea that epigenetic mechanisms regulate host-parasite adaptive phenotypic responses in the course of an infection, in this project I used a natural system involving the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its natural mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae. My investigations combine genome-wide analysis of trancription by RNA-seq, the analysis of histone modifications by ChIP-seq, as well as the study of chromatin structure by ATAC-seq, at different time stages during parasite life-cycle in the mosquito. In this talk I will focus first on the results on the parasite, which show that in the course of a malaria infection P.falciparum undergoes a number of alterations in patterns of gene expression, which depend in turn on reciprocal modifications to the structure and organization of the chromatin. Importantly, these changes impact genes linked to malaria pathogenesis. I will then move to present results on the mosquito vector. In this case, the comparison of histone modification and gene expression profiles between infected and uninfected mosquitoes allowed us to identify malaria responsive epigenes as those mosquito genes showing correlated changes in mRNA and histone mark levels in response to infection. In addition, the analysis of small non-coding RNAs identified a set of mosquito miRNAs whose abundance is altered in response to infection and potentially target multiple immune genes. These findings are not only relevant at the fundamental level for the fields of Plasmodium and mosquito biology, but have important practical implications for the design of new strategies to fight malaria.
Descargar (507,6MB) Obtener la URL o la URL WebDAV.
Histórico de versiones
Versión Fecha Tamaño  
1.0 hace 1 Año 507,6MB