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One out of three roadkilled animals goes undetected by science

Animals may escape and die away from the road after the collision, rebound off the road or retain by vehicle. In these cases, it is so extremely difficult to be recorded through typical roadkill...

Identifican nuevos linajes de parásitos sanguíneos exclusivos de aves que habitan en entornos urbanos

Los resultados del estudio han revelado que algunos parásitos del género Plasmodium, responsables de la malaria aviar, son más diversos en la ciudad que en el campo, presentando algunos linajes que...

Invasive blue crabs can travel more than 100 km upstream

Scientists from the Doñana Biological Station – CSIC warns of the capacity of the blue crab to invade river stretches located far from river mouths. This migrating capacity of blue crabs...

Easter rains bring relief to Doñana, but more rainfall is needed this spring

145.3 l/m2 have been collected during March, mostly during Easter, according to ICTS-Doñana data. Rains come late for wintering, but will still be useful for waterfowl breeding. The annual...

The discovery of fossils of phantom midges suggests an extreme climatic event in New Zealand

Phantom midges are present today on all major landmasses, except Antarctica and New Zealand, where it was believed that they had never inhabited until now
The causes of the extinction of these...

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Nectar and pollen of the invasive century plant Agave americana as a food resource for endemic birds

Nectar and pollen of the invasive century plant Agave americana as a food resource for endemic birds

Invasive species are one of the major causes of biodiversity loss, especially in island ecosystems. However, introduced plants can also bring positive effects to the ecosystem by providing feeding resources for native threatened fauna. Here, the bird guild and its behaviour visiting the invasive century plant Agave americana in an insular environment is describe, and which factors are affecting visitation rates were determined. Number and species of birds visiting inflorescences on Tenerife, Canary Islands, were notes, and the factors affecting the number of visits and the visitor species richness were analysed. 81% of inflorescences were visited by eight native bird species. Visitation rate increased with density and diversity of birds and flower characteristics and decreased through the day. The native bird community uses the invasive century plant as a feeding resource at a higher rate than it uses endemic ornithophilous plants. This could have negative effects for the pollination of endemic plants, but positive effects for birds. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Rodríguez et al (2015) Nectar and pollen of the invasive century plant Agave americana as a food resource for endemic birds Bird Study 1-11 DOI: 10.1080/00063657.2015.1015484