EBD Seminars EBD Seminars

Our seminars (#EBDSeminar) can be attended by anyone interested to assist. They are normally given on Thursday between 13:00 and 14:00 in the conference room of the CABIMER centre (http://www.cabimer.es/web/es/), located next to our building.

During the year about 30 seminars are presented; approximately one third by invited researchers and the rest is given by our own people. Exposed issues are very diverse: scientific results, proposals for projects, protocols of services and labs, etc.

At this moment the seminar organizers are María José Ruiz López y Josué Martínez de la Puente. Contact them if you are willing to give a seminar at EBD! 

Here you can check past seminars. At our Youtube channel (DSA-EBD) several seminars are published. You can download videos here.

Lista Seminarios

  • Título: Plant-ungulate dynamics in Mediterranean areas with high inter-annual variation in plant productivity
    • Centro: 

      Estación Biológica de Doñana

    • Autor: 

      Juan Miguel Giralt

    • Fecha: 

      13 - Dec - 2018

    • Lugar, Hora: 

      CABIMER, 13:00

    • Resumen: 

      Ungulates are keystone elements of many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, as they often regulate vegetation composition and cover, and play crucial roles in other ecological processes (e.g. soil fertilization). In recent decades, strong increases in the abundance and activity of wild ungulates have been reported across temperate and boreal ecosystems. The ecological, economic and social impacts of this changes are potentially strong, and they are receiving increasing attention among researchers, practitioners and policy makers. To understand the reasons behind the current changes in ungulate abundance across different regions of the planet, we must deepen our knowledge of the factors that govern their population dynamics. A key element in forecasting their causes and impacts is the concurrent changes in food availability – i.e. the interplaying influences of plant production and herbivore consumption, and the role of the spatial and movement ecology of the ungulates in regulating such interaction. My PhD thesis focuses on the population dynamics and spatial ecology of the wild and domestic ungulates of the Doñana National Park. The objective is to provide knowledge and criteria for the sustainable management of ungulates in environments with high variability in rainfall and plant productivity. For this purpose, I propose a multidisciplinary approach involving the use of several techniques, including population analysis (historical data on ungulate population counts), demographic models, movement and space use analysis (based on data from GPS-tracked individuals) and spatial models (plant productivity and phenology, based on EO data).

  • Título: Plant community assembly in invaded Mediterranean ecosystems
    • Centro: 

      Estación Biológica de Doñana

    • Autor: 

      Javier Galán Díaz

    • Fecha: 

      13 - Dec - 2018

    • Lugar, Hora: 

      CABIMER 13:30

    • Resumen: 

      Some non-native plants can establish self-sustaining populations and become naturalised in new regions, causing strong impacts by affecting the native flora and fauna, and also the ecosystem services on which people rely. Most biogeographic studies to disentangle the causes of success have compared non-native species populations in the native and in the introduced range, while there have been few approaches at the community level. This thesis will focus on community assemblage of native and non-native plant species on Mediterranean ecosystems. The analysis will be performed at different levels of ecological resolution and will be based on the analysis of large plant datasets, previous empirical data on functional traits, field surveys, and experimental tests. The methodological approach will use tools of functional ecology. Plant functional traits are heritable features, easily measurable at the individual level, and associated to fundamental axes of functional differentiation. The analysis of traits permits the establishment of hierarchies among species which are conserved across environments, therefore allowing for comparisons. My thesis, by scanning plant traits between coexisting native and non-native species across transcontinental areas, will improve our understanding on the biogeography of plant invasions in Mediterranean regions.