EBD Seminars EBD Seminars

Here you can check past seminars. At our Youtube channel (DSA-EBD) several seminars are published. You can download videos here

Our seminars (#EBDSeminar) can be attended by anyone interested to assist. They are normally given on Thursday between 13:00 and 14:00 in the conference room of the CABIMER centre (http://www.cabimer.es/web/es/), located next to our building.

During the year about 30 seminars are presented; approximately one third by invited researchers and the rest is given by our own people. Exposed issues are very diverse: scientific results, proposals for projects, protocols of services and labs, etc.

At this moment the seminar organizers are María José Ruiz López, Irene Mendoza, Maria Teresa Boquete, Christoph Liedke, David García Callejas and Elena Angulo. Contact them if you are planning to give a seminar at EBD! 

 

Lista Seminarios

  • Título: Spatiotemporal changes in wolf populations
    • Centro: 

      Estación Biológica de Doñana

    • Autor: 

      Isabel Salado

    • Fecha: 

      23 - Jan - 2020

    • Lugar, Hora: 

      EBD-CSIC, 13:00 h (Sala de Juntas)

    • Resumen: 

      During the last years, the exponential growth of human population has entailed a dramatic effect on the global biodiversity. Large carnivores have been one of the greatly affected in this biodiversity crisis. Despite apex predators, such as wolves, have apparently increased their distribution range in Europe during the 21st-century, local declines and lack of gene flow between fragmented populations might be hindering the recovery of these carnivores. Specifically, in the Iberian Peninsula, the Iberian wolf (Canis lupus signatus) has remained isolated from the rest of the European wolf populations since 19st-century. During decades, the distribution of the Iberian wolf has been divided in two populations separated by intensive urban and agricultural areas, the Northwestern population and the Southern population, a smaller population located in Sierra Morena. The decline of the Southern population may have made it increasingly vulnerable in an extinction vortex, in which a combination of low population size and negative environmental and genetic factors spiral the population toward extinction. The main objective of my thesis is to understand the evolutionary history of Iberian wolves through the integration of ecological and genetic/omic approaches. In my thesis, I will address biological questions related with genetic diversity, fragmentation and patterns of connectivity in recent and past wolf populations in the Iberian Peninsula by analyzing modern, historic and ancient DNA.

  • Título: Adaptation genomics in islands: the role of introgression and structural variants
    • Centro: 

      Estación Biológica de Doñana

    • Autor: 

      Sara Ravagni

    • Fecha: 

      23 - Jan - 2020

    • Lugar, Hora: 

      EBD-CSIC, 13:00 (Sala de Juntas)

    • Resumen: 

      Islands are unique model systems to study evolutionary processes, such as adaptation, divergence and speciation. In my PhD I will focus on two mechanisms that facilitate local adaptation and convergence: secundary gene flow and structural variants. To do it, I will use two different models: the adaptive radiation of Eleutherodactylus frogs in the Caribbean Islands and a widely distributed species, the common quail, in the Macaronesian islands. Adaptive radiations are an important driver of ecological and phenotypic diversity in island ecosystems, where the adaptation to different and unoccupied habitats favours speciation. In the frog genus Eleutherodactylus, more than 160 species have evolved in the Caribbean islands and diversified to occupy different ecological niches. They represent a good example of convergence and parallel evolution, as the same ecomorphs evolved independently in the different islands. Although speciation in the face of gene flow is generally thought to be difficult, recent studies have shown the importance of gene flow in the evolutionary histories of many clades, both during the divergence process or as result of a secondary contact. To study the role played by adaptive introgression, I will compare different species of Cuban leaf-litter frogs that evolved independently in the same island, testing if gene flow occured among species adapted to the same microhabitat during the lineage divergence process or as a result of secundary contact, as well as which genomic regions were involved. In the Macaronesian islands, the common quails show different phenotypes in pigmentation, body size and wing shape, which could affect their migratory potential. The different morphotypes coexist in the same islands and previous analyses suggest that the differences in phenotype may be caused by a large chromosomal inversion. Assessing the presence of the putative inversion and locating the breakpoint could shed ligth on its role in local adaptation and divergence in the island populations of common quails, as well as on the colonitation and dispersal processes that took place in the different archipelagos.