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The 2024 Newcomb Cleveland Prize celebrates cross-cultural research between western and Indigenous scientists

The award has been given to an interdisciplinary research team with the participation of scientists from the Doñana Biological Station – CSIC
The study looked into the evolutionary...

Enhacing pollinator conservation through landscape heterogeneity

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El Museo Casa de la Ciencia de Sevilla estrena hoy dos nuevas exposiciones sobre biodiversidad y plásticos

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New study shows that seagulls transport hundreds of kilos of plastic from landfills into natural reserves

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Scientific evidence is undeniable: aquifer exploitation is causing serious impacts on the most iconic national park in Spain

A scientific team from the Doñana Biological Station and the Geological and Mining Institute, institutes of the Spanish National Research Council, has reviewed more than 70 studies and demonstrates...

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The spatial distribution of an insular cliff-nesting raptor community

The spatial distribution of an insular cliff-nesting raptor community

The specific spatial distribution and habitat association are major issues in ecology and conservation. Nesting sites of five cliff-nesting raptors (Egyptian vulture [a locally extinct species], common buzzard, osprey, common kestrel, Barbary falcon), and common raven were located and georeferenced on one of the most biodiverse hotspot within the Canary Islands (Teno, Tenerife). Raptor abundance increased with slope, shrub-covered area, and habitat diversity, and decreased with altitude, and forested and grassed areas. Richness increased with slope and decreased with altitude. Threatened species (osprey, Barbary falcon, and raven) occupied cliffs farther away from houses and roads, and more rugged areas than the non-threatened species. Teno holds between 75% and 100% of the insular breeding populations of the most endangered species (osprey and raven), indicating the high conservation value of this area. This study suggests that the preservation of rugged terrains and areas of low human pressure are key factors for raptor conservation and provide basic knowledge on the community structure and habitat associations to develop appropriated management actions for these fragile island populations. información[at]ebd.csic.es: Rodríguez et al (2017) Factors affecting the spatial distribution and breeding habitat of an insular cliff-nesting raptor community. Curr Zool https://doi.org/10.1093/cz/zox005


https://academic.oup.com/cz/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cz/zox005