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One out of three roadkilled animals goes undetected by science

Animals may escape and die away from the road after the collision, rebound off the road or retain by vehicle. In these cases, it is so extremely difficult to be recorded through typical roadkill...

Identifican nuevos linajes de parásitos sanguíneos exclusivos de aves que habitan en entornos urbanos

Los resultados del estudio han revelado que algunos parásitos del género Plasmodium, responsables de la malaria aviar, son más diversos en la ciudad que en el campo, presentando algunos linajes que...

Invasive blue crabs can travel more than 100 km upstream

Scientists from the Doñana Biological Station – CSIC warns of the capacity of the blue crab to invade river stretches located far from river mouths. This migrating capacity of blue crabs...

Easter rains bring relief to Doñana, but more rainfall is needed this spring

145.3 l/m2 have been collected during March, mostly during Easter, according to ICTS-Doñana data. Rains come late for wintering, but will still be useful for waterfowl breeding. The annual...

The discovery of fossils of phantom midges suggests an extreme climatic event in New Zealand

Phantom midges are present today on all major landmasses, except Antarctica and New Zealand, where it was believed that they had never inhabited until now
The causes of the extinction of these...

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Benefits of restoring apex predator populations

Benefits of restoring apex predator populations

The role that apex predators play in ecosystem functioning, disease regulation and biodiversity maintenance is increasingly debated. However, the positive impacts of their presence in terrestrial ecosystems, particularly in human-dominated landscapes, remain controversial. Limited experimental insights regarding the consequences of apex predator recoveries may be behind such controversy and may also impact on the social acceptability towards the recovery of these species. Using a quasi-experimental design and state-of-the-art density estimates, mesopredator abundances were reduced after the restoration of an apex predator, with evidence of resonating positive impacts on lower trophic levels. Specifically, Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus reintroduction was followed by the reduction of the abundance of mesocarnivores (red foxes Vulpes vulpes and Egyptian mongooses Herpestes ichneumon by ca. 80%) and the recovery of small game of high socio-economic value (European rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus and red-legged partridges Alectoris rufa). The observed mesopredator reduction resulted in an estimated 55,6% less rabbit consumption for the entire carnivore guild. These findings have important implications for the social acceptability of Iberian lynx reintroductions, which crucially depend on the perception of private land owners and managers. Under certain circumstances, restoring apex predators may provide a sustainable and ethically acceptable way to reduce mesopredator abundances. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Jiménez et al (2019) Restoring apex predators can reduce mesopredator abundances. Biol Conserv DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2019.108234


https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320719310092?via%3Dihub