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The 2024 Newcomb Cleveland Prize celebrates cross-cultural research between western and Indigenous scientists

The award has been given to an interdisciplinary research team with the participation of scientists from the Doñana Biological Station – CSIC
The study looked into the evolutionary...

Enhacing pollinator conservation through landscape heterogeneity

Having 20% of semi-natural habitats is key for ensuring healthy pollinator populations in Europe. OBServ projectaimed to leverage pollinators and the ecosystem services they provide as a key model...

El Museo Casa de la Ciencia de Sevilla estrena hoy dos nuevas exposiciones sobre biodiversidad y plásticos

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New study shows that seagulls transport hundreds of kilos of plastic from landfills into natural reserves

Researchers from the Doñana Biological Station (EBD-CSIC) have developed a plastic deposition model based on the diet and movement of gulls monitored by GPS telemetry, while feeding in landfills in...

Scientific evidence is undeniable: aquifer exploitation is causing serious impacts on the most iconic national park in Spain

A scientific team from the Doñana Biological Station and the Geological and Mining Institute, institutes of the Spanish National Research Council, has reviewed more than 70 studies and demonstrates...

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Foxes, rabbits and nightjars interact on roads

Foxes, rabbits and nightjars interact on roads

Linear developments, such as roads, firebreaks, and railways, provide a stark juxtaposition of different habitats with contrasting associated predation risks, thus potentially influencing predator–prey interactions. However, empirical evidence is still very limited. The effect of fox abundance and that of their main prey, the European rabbit, on habitat selection by an alternative prey, the red-necked nightjar, was studied in a road network crossing the Doñana Natural Space. Nightjars generally forage on the same roads used by foxes to search for alternative prey when rabbits are scarce and, as a result, predation risk for nightjars may vary over time. Contrary to expectations, nightjars continued foraging on roads when foxes were most abundant, yet they behaved more cautiously. During risky periods, nightjars perched nearby tall roadside cover, which is known to functions as a protective barrier against fox attacks. Conversely, when predation risk decreased, nightjars shifted to safer microsites near short plants, further away from the roadside. This study shows how nightjar plasticity in microhabitat selection allows them to forage even in areas where predators are abundant, and highlights the important role that linear structures may play in interspecific interactions. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Camacho et el (2017) Nightjars, rabbits, and foxes interact on unpaved roads: spatial use of a secondary prey in a shared-predator system. Ecosphere DOI: 10.1002/ecs2.1611


http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecs2.1611/full