News News

Accumulation of pollutants in the brains of dolphins

This study shows that halogenated flame retardants, both banned PBDEs and their substitutes, are able to cross the blood–brain barrier of cetaceans and penetrating the brain. The study also examined the presence of halogenated natural products produced by algae and sponges. All of these compounds have been found in the brains of analyzed dolphins, confirming that they are able to cross the brain-blood barrier. How these compounds cross the blood-brain barrier? Do they have neurological effects? Can the same be happening to humans? According to the results of the work, concentrations are different for each of the compounds studied, depending on facility to penetrate the brain. The higher levels found are of new flame retardants, which would demonstrate that they have greater ability to cross the blood-brain membrane, followed by PBDEs and finally halogenated natural products produced by seaweeds and sponges. This implies the need for further studies to evaluate the possible neurological effects of these new flame retardants. It could be that the new retardants are even more harmful than banned PBDEs. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Baron et al (2015) Halogenated Natural Products in Dolphins: Brain–Blubber Distribution and Comparison with Halogenated Flame Retardants. Environ Sci Technol DOI: 10.1021/acs.est.5b02736


http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.5b02736
Average (0 Votes)

Latest News Latest News

Models for human porphyrias: Have animals in the wild been overlooked?

Humans accumulate porphyrins in the body mostly during the course of porphyrias, diseases caused by defects in the enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and that produce acute attacks, skin...

Combined effects of global change on bumblebees

The decline in bee populations has recently attracted much attention from researchers, conservationists and the general public, with insect-mediated pollination being a key process for terrestrial...

Artificial light at night as a driver of urban colonization

Urbanization and artificial light at night (ALAN) are major drivers of local biodiversity losses causing community alterations, disruption of predator-prey interactions, and ultimately, promotion...

A new subspecies of Manx shearwater to the Canary Islands

The taxonomy of Procellariiformes, particularly petrels and shearwaters, is still unresolved. The Manx shearwater Puffinus puffinus is one of the best studied seabirds worldwide. Most of the...

For a better production, agriculture areas need to recover at least 20% of natural habitat

International agreements aim to conserve 17% of Earth’s land area by 2020 but include no area-based conservation targets within the working landscapes that support human needs through farming,...