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For a better production, agriculture areas need to recover at least 20% of natural habitat

International agreements aim to conserve 17% of Earth's land area by 2020 but include no area-based conservation targets within the working landscapes that support human needs through farming, ranching, and forestry. Through a review of country-level legislation, this study found that just 38% of countries have minimum area requirements for conserving native habitats within working landscapes. The study argues for increasing native habitats to at least 20% of working landscape area where it is below this minimum. Such target has benefits for food security, nature's contributions to people, and the connectivity and effectiveness of protected area networks in biomes in which protected areas are underrepresented. Other urgings of the review include maintaining native habitat at higher levels where it currently exceeds the 20% minimum, and a literature review shows that even more than 50% native habitat restoration is needed in particular landscapes. Including a >20% native habitats within working landscapes restoration target offers an unrivaled opportunity to simultaneously enhance biodiversity, food security and quality of life. The post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework is an opportune moment to include a minimum habitat restoration target for working landscapes that contributes to, but does not compete with, initiatives for expanding protected areas, the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (2021–2030) and the UN Sustainable Development Goals. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Garibaldi et al (2020) Working landscapes need at least 20% native habitat. Conserv Letter DOI: 10.1111/conl.12773


https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12773
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Dwarfism in continental populations of natterjack toads in the absence of genetic isolation

Dwarfism in continental populations of natterjack toads in the absence of genetic isolation

Ample variation in body size is common in vertebrates over extensive geographical distances, or in isolated populations, where effective geographical barriers may cause dwarfism or gigantism. The potential causes of extreme size reduction in continental populations of amphibians within a short geographical distance and in the absence of geographical barriers were studied. Natterjack toads Epidalea calamita in Doñana National Park (Spain) experience up to 2.1?fold difference in body mass in as little as 37?km. Studying six populations divergent in body size, the genetic isolation of the dwarf populations using multilocus genotypes (16 microsatellites) was tested. Additionally, it was explored whether populations differed in trophic status (through stable isotope analysis), standard metabolic rate and growth pattern, senescence and age structure (conducting telomere length assays and skeletochronology). Advertisement calls were also recorded across populations and experimentally tested for behavioural reinforcement of the body size variation through female preferences. Local dwarfism in these populations occurs in the absence of genetic isolation while maintaining relatively high effective population sizes. Dwarf populations, however, were exposed to drier and warmer climatic conditions, have different trophic status, show lower mass?specific metabolic rate, and male advertisement calls with a higher dominant frequency. Juvenile growth differed among populations, reaching the adult stage at different body sizes. Altogether, these results suggest a significant influence of environmental conditions on the physiology and ecology of the Doñana E. calamita populations, mainly affecting toads between metamorphosis and sexual maturity. Further experimental and genomic studies focusing on these early life stages are necessary to dissect the relative roles of the environment and adaptive genetic differentiation on this phenomenon. informacion[at]ebd.csci.es: Hyeun-Ji et al (2020) Dwarfism in close continental amphibian populations despite lack of genetic isolation. OIKOS Doi 10.1111/oik.07086


https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/oik.07086