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Impact of fisheries on sea turtles

The bycatch of sea turtles by industrial fisheries is receiving an increasing attention in recent years due to the high impact it causes on these endangered species. This issue was evaluated in southern Spain waters that harbors an important feeding ground of loggerhead and leatherback turtles, including the endangered Eastern Atlantic loggerhead population. To quantify the impact that different fisheries represents to sea turtles, 272 fishermen answered to detailed illustrated questionnaires in all the main ports of Andalusia and Murcia (Spain) during 2014. This study has updated the knowledge of turtle bycatch in the southwestern Mediterranean revealing a widespread impact of fisheries on sea turtles. Fishermen recognized an annual catch of 2.3 turtles per boat. Considering the census of industrial fishing boats in the study area (1182), more than 2840 sea turtles could be bycaught per year in the study area. Most of captures (96.2%) were produced during the summer. These results suggest a severe impact of most of legal fisheries (surface longline, pursue seine, trawling and small scale fisheries) on loggerhead feeding grounds in the southwestern Mediterranean. Fishermen suggests that drift fishing conducted by foreign or illegal fishermen and almadrabas are also causing a significant bycatch of turtles. Several measures such as reviewing compliance of current fishing and environmental regulations, modifying turtle technics to reduce turtle bycatch (e.g. reduction of the use of squid as bait and disposal of hooks deeper in the water column), facilitating the rescue and handle of wound turtles and their transport to the port for recovery, and recognizing the efforts of anglers to perform a more sustainable fishing, are recommended to mitigate this impact. informacion[at]ebd.csic.es: Marco et al (2020) Sea turtle bycatch by different types of fisheries in southern Spain. Basic and Applied Herpetology https://doi.org/10.11160/bah.187


http://ojs.herpetologica.org/index.php/bah/article/view/187
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Workshop: Developing a priority list of invasive alien species in Europe

Developing a priority list of invasive alien species in Europe

The EU has recently approved its Regulation on the prevention and management of the introduction and spread of invasive alien species, which will come into force in 2015. For successful implementation, the European Commission will need to adopt an EU list of invasive alien species, to be agreed with the Member States. BirdLife Europe, an international organization that promotes conservation science-based, will propose a priority list of species based on the best available evidence of potential impact, and will be achieved through a systematic approach. This task is organized along with the Estación Biológica de Doñana (EBD-CSIC) around two workshops that will be hosted in our premises in Seville on January 21st – 22nd.

Among participants: the universities of Cambridge, Vienna and Berne, the Centre for Environmental Research of Leipzig (UFZ, Germany), the Zoological Society of London, the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, international (EPPO, IUCN) and national organizations (Belgian Biodiversity Platform).