Content with tag carotenoids .

Unique evolution of vitamin A as an external pigment in tropical starlings

Pigments are largely responsible for the appearance of organisms. Most biological pigments derive from the metabolism of shikimic acid (melanins), mevalonic acid (carotenoids) or levulinic acid (porphyrins), which thus generate the observed diversity of external phenotypes.

Dynamic signalling in the greater flamingo

Colourful plumage is typical of males in species with conventional sex roles, in which females care for offspring and males compete for females, as well as in many monogamous species in which both sexes care for offspring. Reversed sexual dichromatism—more colourful females than males—is predominant in species with sex role reversal. In the latter species, males care for offspring and females compete for mates, the mating system is mainly polyandrous and there is reversed size...

Tropical bat as mammalian model for skin carotenoid metabolism

Animals cannot synthesize carotenoid pigments de novo, and must consume them in their diet. Most mammals, including humans, are indiscriminate accumulators of carotenoids but inefficiently distribute them to some tissues and organs. To date, no mammal has been known to have evolved physiological mechanisms to incorporate and deposit carotenoids in the skin or hair. Here it is shown that the Honduran white bat colors its skin bright yellow with the deposition of the xanthophyll lutein.