Content with tag vector-borne disease .

Plasmodium transmission risk differs between mosquito species and parasite lineages

Factors such as the particular combination of parasite-mosquito species, their co-evolutionary history, and the host’s parasite load greatly affect parasite transmission. However, the importance of these factors in the epidemiology of mosquito-borne parasites, such as avian malaria parasites, is largely unknown. Here, the competence of two mosquito species (Culex pipiens and Aedes (Ochlerotatus) caspius), for the transmission of four avian Plasmodium lineages...

Vector competence of Aedes caspius and Ae. albopictus mosquitoes for Zika virus, Spain

The vector competence of Aedes caspius and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes in Spain for the transmission of Zika virus was assessed. Whereas Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were a competent vector, Ae. caspius mosquitoes were unable to transmit Zika virus. High levels of vertical transmission of Zika virus in Ae. albopictus mosquitoes were also identified.

Towards the identification of C. paolae and C. circumscriptus as potential vectors of avian haemosporidian parasites

Haemosporidians are the most important vector-borne parasites due to their cosmopolitan distribution and their wide range of hosts, including humans. Identification of their vectors is critical to highlight ecologically and epidemiologically relevant features such as host specificity or transmission routes. Biting midges of the genus Culicoides are considered the main vectors of Haemoproteus spp., yet important information on aspects such as vector feeding preferences or vector-host...

Parasite’s cost on insect vectors

Avian Plasmodium and malaria-like parasites of the genus Haemoproteus are widespread vector-borne parasites commonly found infecting birds. These parasites impose deleterious effects on their vertebrate hosts compromising their survival. While the interaction between these parasites and their vertebrate hosts has received much attention, the study of those factors determining the consequences of parasite infections in the insect vectors has been traditionally neglected.

Aedes vittatus in Spain: current distribution, barcoding characterization and potential role as a vector of human diseases

Aedes vittatus is currently found in Africa, Asia and Europe, where it acts as a vector of pathogens causing animal and human diseases. Like other Aedes species, Ae. vittatus is able to breed in artificial containers. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control has recently highlighted the need for molecular tools (i.e. barcoding characterization) that enable Aedes species to be identified in entomological surveys.